Magu Bee at World's End

A travel blog of one crazy Magu Bee traveling the globe.

Tanah Lot is one of the most famous temples on Bali. Well, Pura Tanah Lot is the temple, Tanah Lot is the rock formation it's on, as it translates into "Land [in the] Sea".



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It's situated very close to Denpasar, the Balinese capital, and I spent one afternoon walking around the temple's grounds. Before you get to the shrine, you will most probably be guided to make your way through carefully designed stalls with souvenirs and other touristy artifacts. Not knowing it, however, we somehow managed to get to the temple without passing through the market place.
The motor ride from Kuta was short and pleasant, although my host and I had to wait out the rain on our way back. I tried using the time to go to the hairdresser's, it was so much cheaper in one of the small towns than in Kuta! (so like dirty dirty cheap instead of the normal cheap), but they were so scared I spoke English to them, they didn't know what to do with me. I wish I had written down the name of a place we stopped by for dinner that afternoon - really good Indian food by the road just outside of Kuta.


It originates in the 15th century and a priest called Nirartha is supposedly to be thanked for its construction. Or the idea of such, at least.


He is said to have been travelling along the southern coast of the island and once he saw the picturesque rocky formations, he decided to spend the night there. He was approached by some local fishermen, whom he'd later tell to build a shrine on the rock he had spent the night on - he believed it a holy place and said it should be used as a worship place for the Balinese sea gods.


Haven't encountered any gods myself, just lots of tourists, but the truth is the place has some kind of magic in it. Very serene, natural and extremly beautifully located, it's definitely worthwhile.


An interesting fact is that by the 80s the rock, constantly kissed by water tides, began to crumble, thus becoming dangerous for the shrine and its visitors. Luckily, Japan granted the Indonesian government a small loan (only about 130mln$) with the purpose of preserving Pura Tanah Lot, as well as a couple of other significant points around the island.


So now, what is behind me, is actually mostly "superficial rock", the creation of which was surpervised and funded by the Japs.

It's actually one of seven temples built along the coast. Apparently, each one of them was established within eyesight of the next to form a chain along the whole south-western coast, but I must admit I didn't notice that.



One of the coolest surf spots I've seen in Indonesia is... here! You can actually come and surf in this petite bay on the temple's grounds. Too cool for school or what?


Those little dots in the water that you probably barely see are surfers. Some kickass ones at that - I guees the Balinese sea gods must really like that spot.


Of course the moment we saw a 'no entry' sign on one of the rocks, we decided to go exactly there. Not only is the place great for surfers, there are people sitting on the rock sides and ... fishing!


A definite must if you're on Bali!

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